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CSLF NEWS is an electronic news service providing you with links to news articles from around the world related to carbon capture and storage technology. CSLF NEWS is offered by the CSLF Secretariat. If you'd like to receive CSLF NEWS, please contact us.

April 23, 2014

 

Carbon Capture and Storage

Carbon Capture Faces Hurdles of Will, Not Technology
Climate Central – April 23
If human-caused climate change is to be slowed enough to avert the worst consequences of global warming, carbon dioxide emissions from coal-fired power plants and other pollutants will have to be captured and injected deep into the ground to prevent them from being released into the atmosphere.


Carbon Capture Faces Hurdles of Will, Not Technology
Kitsap Sun – April 23
If human-caused climate change is to be slowed enough to avert the worst consequences of global warming, carbon dioxide emissions from coal-fired power plants and other pollutants will have to be captured and injected deep into the ground to prevent them from being released into the atmosphere.


Canadian firm innovates concrete production with carbon capture
eco-business.com – April 23
Carbon dioxide emissions, along with other greenhouse gases, is a contributor to global warming, but one company has found a way to use it in concrete production such that it now contributes to carbon reduction instead.


Renewable energy not as viable as carbon capture: energy vet
CanadianManufacturing.com – April 22
Investments in renewable energy would have been better spent on carbon capture and storage solutions to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, said Clive Mather, former president and CEO of Shell Canada Ltd.


Carbon Capture and Storage Technology for Atmospheric Carbon ...
Ecopreneurist – April 23
While it’s still important to reduce the amount of all greenhouse gas emissions from all of our activities, we still need to tackle the challenge of reducing the atmospheric carbon we’ve already produced.  To do that, we need viable technology for effective carbon capture and storage that can be used for atmospheric carbon removal, and while there are a number of promising developments, as outlined below, so far there is no one technology that covers all of the relevant pieces of the carbon reduction puzzle.

 

Climate Change

Spending Earth Day at Ground Zero for Climate Change In America
TIME – April 23
We’ve all seen the iconic Blue Marble photo of the earth from space, the image that launched a thousand nature essays, but Bill Nelson and Piers Sellers are among the few people who have enjoyed that perspective on the planet in the flesh. Nelson is now a U.S. Senator from Florida, Sellers is a top NASA science official, and this morning, at an Earth Day hearing in my Miami Beach neighborhood, I got to hear the two former astronauts reminisce about the view from 10 million feet.


No, no, no, and no: GOP Senate candidates on climate change
MSNBC – April 23
The entire field of Republican Senate candidates in North Carolina do not believe in climate change.
At a Republican primary debate Tuesday night, a moderator asked the four candidates if they felt climate change was a fact, as seen in a video clipped by Buzzfeed.


Few business leaders say climate change is serious
CBS News – April 22
Here's a sober thought for Earth Day: only 39 percent of North American business leaders believe climate change is a problem requiring immediate action.


Poll: 1 in 4 skeptical of global warming
The Hill (blog) – April 22
One in four in the United States are skeptical that global warming is occurring, according to a new Gallup poll. The poll, released on Tuesday, found that the public is separated into three groups when it comes to their beliefs on global warming: the "concerned believers, mixed middle, and cool skeptics." Gallup's poll, conducted this year, found that 39 percent of U.S. adults are "concerned believers," 36 percent are in the middle, and the last 25 percent are skeptics.

 


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